Category Archives: High School

Provocative Second-Impact Syndrome Article Headlines Latest Issue of Concussion Litigation Reporter

The September issue of Concussion Litigation Reporter features many great stories. But one in particular may strike a nerve. Steven E. Pachman, Esq., Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads and Kimberly L. Sachs, Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law co-wrote an article entitled “Second Impact Syndrome: Diagnosis versus Myth.”

Other stories in the issue include:

Appeals Court Grants Relief to Riddell in Coverage Action

Jury Awards Concussed Softball Player $1.1 Million

Court Filing Urges Helmet Requirements to Protect Women Lacrosse Players

New Study Suggests Brain is in Recovery Mode Long After Athletes Have Been Cleared to Return to Play

The Golden State’s Golden Payouts No Longer Available to All Retired Athletes

Insurance Company and Conference Reportedly Settle Coverage Question

Letters of Protection, Deferred Medical Payments, and the Law

Attorney Assails CTE Study, Praises the Benefits of ‘Combat’ Sports

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Wyoming High School Activities Association Provides Concussion Insurance for Wyoming Students

Every high school and middle school student participating in a Wyoming High School Activities Association (WHSAA) sponsored activity will now be covered by concussion insurance in 2017.

Specifically, the WHSAA purchased a policy for all of its student participants, approximately 25,000 annually, providing them with “zero out-of-pocket costs should they suffer a head injury,” according to the association. Wyoming is the 5th state to provide this coverage for all student participants.

“The WHSAA is pleased to be able to offer this protection for all of our students involved in activity programs,” Commissioner Ron Laird said. “This policy coverage will assist families should their student need to visit a medical professional due to a concussion. With the money we have received through our agreement with the NFHS Network, we have been able to create a revenue stream to cover the approximately $37,000+ premium.”

This is another proactive step by the WHSAA Board of Directors that assures all WHSAA student participants, who are diagnosed with a sport or activity related concussion, will be afforded treatment with no out-of-pocket costs.

“We have been active in attempting to minimize risks for our students for many years with the assistance of our Sports Medicine Advisory Committee,” said Laird. “The WHSAA was one of the first states to establish a rule of not allowing a student to participate after being unconscious during a contest. Student safety remains our number one focus. This is just another opportunity for us to assist in taking care of our student participants.”

The insurance is the HeadStrong Concussion Insurance Program developed by Dissinger Reed Insurance. It covers every student in grades five through twelve participating in any practice or game sanctioned by the WHSAA.

“The WHSAA’s continued commitment to concussion care is exemplary and should be applauded,” said Dissinger Reed owner and CEO, Christian Reed. “Their proactive approach to protecting the young athletes in Wyoming has been fantastic and we are thrilled they are the 5th state association to adopt the HeadStrong program.”

For any claim, the participant’s insurance would first be billed and then the HeadStrong insurance would act as secondary insurance and assist with unpaid deductibles or co-pays. The maximum benefit is $25,000 per injury and there is no deductible per claim.

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Canadian Concussion Collaborative Identifies Characteristics of Good Concussion Clinics

The Canadian Concussion Collaborative (CCC) released today a guide to help parents and their children choose a good concussion clinic.

Signs or symptoms of a concussion can include headaches, blurred vision, dizziness, nausea or vomiting, and sensitivity to light or noise. For about nine in 10 people with concussions, symptoms heal gradually after seven to 10 days, but those with continuing symptoms may need a personalized care plan.

Finding a good concussion clinic that offers management and treatment can be confusing.

4 Characteristics of a Good Concussion Clinic suggests the questions to ask a clinic to make sure you’re receiving high-quality care that is supported by current guidelines.

“The guide provides important questions to ask and outlines the best approach to concussion care and management,” says Dr. Pierre Frémont, Chair of the CCC and professor at the department of rehabilitation in sports medicine general practice at Université Laval.

The four key characteristics to keep in mind when selecting a concussion clinic are:

  1. Medical doctor: Clinics should have timely access to physicians with experience in treating concussions who can do the initial assessment, direct care and provide final medical clearance.
  2. Team of licensed health care professionals: Clinics should have access to licensed professionals from several health care disciplines. They can provide complimentary expertise and work with the medical doctor to design a personalized treatment plan.
  3. Adhere to the most up-to-date standards of care: Recommended standards of care are updated every few years by groups of experts and are shared via documents like the international Consensus statement on concussion in sport.
  4. Tools, tests and recommendations used: Clinics should perform tests recommended in the most current international Consensus statement on concussion in sport to evaluate different components such as symptoms, mental functions and balance. Pre-season baseline testing is not recommended for children and adolescents.

“Good care and treatment is essential to a positive recovery from a concussion. Being able to identify a good concussion clinic that follows best practices provided by licensed health professionals is an important first step,” said Dr. Frémont.

About the Canadian Concussion Collaborative

The mission of the CCC is to create synergy between health organizations concerned with concussions in order to improve both the education about concussions, and the implementation of best practices for their prevention and management.

The CCC is composed of members from the following organizations:

  • Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine
  • Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians
  • Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists
  • Canadian Athletic Therapists Association
  • Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport
  • Canadian Chiropractic Association
  • Canadian Medical Association
  • Canadian Neurosurgical Society
  • Canadian Paediatric Society
  • Canadian Physiotherapy Association
  • Canadian Psychological Association
  • College of Family Physicians of Canada
  • National Emergency Nurses Association
  • Ontario Medical Association Sport & Exercise Medicine Section
  • Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation
  • Parachute
  • Royal College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences (Canada)

For more information, please visit http://casem-acmse.org/education/ccc/

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