Category Archives: Outside U.S.

Parachute announces Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport to Protect Health of Active Canadians

Concussions in sport are a recognized public health problem because of their frequency of occurrence and their potential short- and long-term consequences. These include cognitive, emotional and physical symptoms, and when left undetected, even death. Parachute Canada (Parachute) works closely with concussion experts from across the country to better understand the most effective prevention, recognition and management strategies for concussion. Today, Parachute is announcing the new Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport.

Based on scientific evidence from the 5th International Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport, and developed with Parachute’s Expert Advisory Concussion Subcommittee, the comprehensive Canadian Guideline creates the foundation for a more consistent approach to concussion across the country, which will allow participants to play safer and continue training, competing, and enjoying a full, active life.

The Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport is part of the Parachute-led Concussion Protocol Harmonization Project. With support from the Public Health Agency of Canada, and in collaboration with the Department of Canadian Heritage – Sport Canada, Parachute is working with National Sport Organizations to ensure concussion protocols that align with the Canadian Guideline are in place across Canada’s amateur sport community.

The announcement comes following the Conference of Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation in Winnipeg. Steve Podborski, Parachute President & CEO and Olympian, is available to media.

Quick Facts

    Sport and recreation-related injuries account for more than half of child and youth injuries treated in emergency departments across Canada.

    Among children and youth (10-18 years) who visit an emergency department for a sports-related head injury, 39% were diagnosed with concussions, while a further 24% were possible concussions.

    The Government of Canada is investing $1.4 million to develop a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to preventing, managing and raising awareness among Canadians about concussions.

Quotes

“I encourage all Canadians to incorporate more physical activity into their daily lives. However, I also want to encourage safe practices to prevent possible injuries. The Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport not only raises concussion awareness, but also provides parents, coaches, athletes and healthcare professionals with an evidence-based approach to preventing, identifying, managing and treating concussions.”

– The Honourable Jane Philpott, P.C., M.P., Minister of Health

“I am excited that the Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport is now available to all Canadians. It’s an invaluable tool, which will allow athletes, especially our young ones, to enjoy sport in a safe manner. I truly hope that this guideline will be used by all provinces and territories to ensure that proper return-to-play and return-to-learn protocols are followed by all.”

– The Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

“We are honoured to work with the Public Health Agency of Canada and other elite members of the medical community, who are helping us better understand concussion prevention, recognition and management strategies to better equip Canadian athletes, coaches, educators and parents with the right information. The Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport will ensure there is consistent, evidence-based concussion information across the board for amateur sport organizations.”

– Steve Podborski, Parachute President & CEO

“I am 100% supportive of a national strategy on concussion to create a more consistent approach across the country. Many Canadian athletes compete in multiple sports, so having our sport organizations on the same page about concussion is critical to ensure our athletes are managed properly. This way they can continue competing, and excelling, at home and on the international stage.”

– Curt Harnett, Olympian, three-time Olympic medalist, Chef de Mission Rio 2016

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July 2017 Issue of Concussion Litigation Reporter

Here’s the table of contents of the July 2017 (Vol. 6, No. 1) issue of Concussion Litigation Reporter, which features timely reporting on developments and legal strategies at the intersection of sports and concussions.

Articles

  • Fourth Circuit Affirms Lower Court Ruling, Finding NFL’s Post-Retirement Disability Apparatus Failed Ex-Player
  • Court Dismisses Concussion Lawsuit Against Coach as Her Inexperience Works in Her Favor
  • Boogaard Ruling Blurs NHL Liability in Head-Injury Suits
  • Negligence or Assumption of Risk? The Case of Rugby Player George North
  • A Boxing Tragedy: The Prichard Colon Case
  • Bylaw Giving Teeth to Physicians and Athletic Trainers in Return-to-Play Decisions Set to Kick Off for Division II and III
  • Head Impact Exposure Increases as Youth Football Players Get Older, Bigger
  • Magistrate Recommends That Some of Omnibus Claim From Mother and Her Concussed Daughter Can Continue
  • Looking in all the Wrong Places: The Tragic Death of Aaron Hernandez
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ICHIRF: PFA To Support Concussion in Sport Project

The Concussion Foundation has announced that the PFA (Professional Footballers Association) has donated funds to support the Concussion in Sport study set up by ICHIRF (International Concussion & Head Injury Research Foundation). This project is looking at the long-term effects of concussion in men and women who have competed in impact sports and the support of the PFA will ensure that retired footballers are now included in this study.

Dr Michael Turner, Director of Concussion in Sport, says: “The support of the PFA is a major step forward and will ensure that our research now includes retired footballers. This will broaden the scope of the ICHIRF project and we are extremely grateful to Gordon Taylor and John Bramhall for their confidence in our ground-breaking study”

The ICHIRF project is part of a multi-national collaboration between concussion research centres in Australia, Switzerland and the USA. This independent research seeks to establish whether retired sportsmen and sportswomen have an increased incidence of, or suffer an earlier onset of neuro-degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s Disease, Alzheimer’s Disease and the condition currently described as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

ICHIRF is also looking for control subjects who have never suffered a concussion and further information can be found at www.ichirf.org or by contacting Pippa Theo at the ICHIRF Office, pippa@ichirf.org 0207 935 3015.

 

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