Tag Archives: event

Brain Health Doctor to Talk Concussion Treatment at Brain Injury Canada

Brain Injury Canada’s First Semi Annual Conference, “Brain Injury Matters: Research, Innovation and Inspiration”, will be held April 14 – 15, 2015.

Dr. Joanny Liu will speak at this event about her Proactive Concussion Treatment Protocol. She will describe how modern neuroscience research in both neuroplasticity and neuropsychology can be applied to help people overcome their mild traumatic brain injury. Her presentation will cover key issues such as:

The Three Giant Myths About Concussion – New research reveals that these myths are holding people back from healing, stopping them from getting back on their feet faster

What the New Research in Brain Plasticity Says – Explore the existing research in neuroscience to create new concussion treatment in a clinical setting

Tips and Strategies – Apply the new research in practical terms to begin the process to rewire the brain and kickstart the healing process.

Full details on the event can be found on the Brain Injury Canada website at


When asked about the reasons behind speaking at this event, Dr. Joanny Liu, Chief Optimism Creator at Harmoni Health, said:

“A concussion can happen to anyone. It can also be treated and reversed successfully. Since it’s the most common of brain injuries this is especially important. So many go unreported for fear of being taken out of activities for far too long. And the newest research definitely supports getting people back into their normal lives sooner rather than later. Total rest has forced too many people to take too long to heal or they have relapses or they’re told that they’re at risk for future concussions. It’s time to empower sufferers. Anyone with a concussion can heal when they become proactive instead of being passive. It’s time to think and act outside-of-the-box. This follows a new trend in medicine that is just beginning to understand how psychological well being heavily influences physical well being. This trend dovetails quite nicely with Ancient Chinese Sports Medicine and Sports Psychology. We can use the brain to heal the brain. In fact, the entire healing process requires a major and committed pattern interrupt. I’d also add that the pattern interrupt must also occur in those health practitioners helping people to recover. We’ve got to think and do things differently too instead of holding on to outdated concepts.”

The Brain Injury Canada website has full details about the sessions at this year’s new semi-annual event. Interested parties can visit the website at:


For more information about us, please visit http://www.drjoanny.com

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Concussions: A Parent’s Persepctive

By David Bookstaff

(Editor’s Note: The writer is the VP of Operations for Sports Brain (www.sportsbrain.com). The article is reprinted from the company’s March newsletter)

As a part of the Sports Brain team, I recently attended
both the American Football Coaches Association
(AFCA) Convention in Indianapolis and the National
Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA)
Convention in Philadelphia. I was excited to attend
these events for three reasons:

• First, I was anticipating a great response from
attendees about the work we are doing.

• Second, I was excited to be able to see and meet
top level coaches and former athletes that I have
watched on the sidelines and in games for many

• Finally, as a parent with kids who are athletically
involved. I was excited to gain insight into the
perspectives of coaches and organizations.

Looking back now, I was not disappointed by my
expectations and I learned some valuable lessons.

Overall, the conference attendees loved what we
were doing. Former athletes and coaches of all
levels stopped by and commented on the need for
our services and the desire to work with us. It was
not uncommon for a former athlete to say, “I wish you
were around when I was playing.” My experience
meeting former athletes and coaches was equally
rewarding. I had the privilege of meeting several
current and retired elite collegiate coaches and they
were all friendly and interested in what was going
on in the concussion world. They acknowledged
that times have changed and will continue to change
as we learn more and more about the dangers of
multiple concussions and head injury. It was great to
see the interest in our work and gain a perspective
on how much the concussion knowledge has
developed in the past 20 years. We also heard
from people who had been around their sports for a
long time about how much has changed in terms of
concussion awareness in even the last 5 to 10 years.

The most interesting part for me, however, came
on the final day of NSCAA, after a special event
honoring the Collegiate All-Americans. Many of the
All-Americans, and their parents, walked through
the exhibit hall. Almost every family walking by our
booth stopped to talk to us. Each had a personal
story about concussions and the damage the
concussions caused to them personally or to a
teammate. The parents, in general, commented
that soccer has been a tremendous experience for
their children, teaching them great life lessons and
opening many doors. For some, college would never
have been an option if they did not receive a soccer
scholarship. At the same time, there was a recurring
theme that as great as the game has been for them,
few expected playing soccer to be a viable career.

Statistically, the odds are overwhelmingly against
becoming a professional athlete. There are a lot
of kids playing soccer and as the kids grow and
develop, fewer and fewer make it to the next level.

We always encourage kids to keep developing
because if you work hard enough, practice to
develop the right skills, have the athleticism and stay
healthy you might just make it. But it is important
for the parents to understand the long odds of all
of those elements falling into place because that
knowledge will help them recognize the importance
of concussion management, since most of their kids
will not have a professional soccer career.

The parents believe, rather strongly, that we
have to fight concussions and we have to protect
our children by insisting on the development of
concussion management programs for all athletes.

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Concussions Are the Theme at the Santa Clara Institute of Sports Law and Ethics Symposium

The Santa Clara Institute of Sports Law and Ethics Symposium has made “Sports Concussions: Problems and Proposed Solutions” the theme of its annual event, set for September 12 at Santa Clara University.

Among the speakers are keynoters Alan Schwarz of the NY Times and NFL Senior Vice-President for Health and Safety Policy, Jeff Miller. There will be a panel on medical issues, chaired by Dr. Robert Cantu, who is a Professor of Neurosurgery at Boston University and who is the author of a leading book on issues with youth concussions; a panel on football, chaired by Ramogi Huma, President of the National College Players Association; a panel on soccer, chaired by Olympic and World Cup champion, Brandi Chastain; a panel on youth issues, chaired by Tom Farrey of ESPN; and a panel on legal issues chaired by Ted Leland, the Athletic Director of University of the Pacific. Also speaking will be retired football players, including Hall-of-Famer, Ronnie Lott, and three-time All Pro, Brent Jones.

There will also be a special lunchtime presentation, “What we can learn from What Happened at Rutgers” by Jack Clark, the Cal Berkeley rugby coach who has won 22 NCAA Championships, and Jim Thompson, CEO and Founder of Positive Coaching Alliance.

For more on the September 12 event, which runs from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., visit http://law.scu.edu/sportslaw/2013-symposium

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