Marquette Hosts Forum on Sports-related Concussions

Marquette University’s College of Health Sciences will host a breakfast forum called “Concussion – Societal Impact of Sports-related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” on Monday, Jan. 28, at 7:15 a.m. in the third-floor ballroom of the Alumni Memorial Union, 1442 W. Wisconsin Ave. in Milwaukee.

The forum, which is free and open to the public, includes a complimentary continental breakfast and parking in the 16th Street parking structure, located between Wisconsin Ave. and Wells Street. Registration is required and available online.

Panelists, which will include George Koonce, a former NFL linebacker and current member of the NFL’s Player Engagement Advisory Board, will discuss the long-term effects of concussion, what the impact is on the developing brain and what can be done to prevent one.

Dr. William Cullinan, dean of the College of Health Sciences, will moderate the panel of experts in neuroscience, health, athletic training and sports law. They include:

•  Dr. Michael McCrea, professor of neurosurgery and neurology and director of brain injury research, Medical College of Wisconsin; research neuropsychologist, Clement Zablocki VA Medical Center

•  Dr. George E. Koonce, Jr., director of development, Marquette University; former NFL linebacker and member of  the NFL’s Player Engagement Advisory Board

•  David Leigh, clinical assistant professor and assistant athletic trainer, Marquette University

•  Matthew Mitten, professor of law and director of the National Sports Law Institute, Marquette University

•  Carolyn Smith, M.D., executive director of Student Health Service and clinical professor in the College of Health Sciences, Marquette University

Interested attendees can register here: https://muconnect.marquette.edu/concussionforum

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