CLF co-founders react to concerning new study data: “Who will protect the brains of college football players?”

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CLF co-founders react to concerning new study data: “Who will protect the brains of college football players?”

CLF’s co-founders Christopher Nowinski, Ph.D. and Robert Cantu, M.D. have advocated for more than a decade that the best way to reduce the negative outcomes of brain trauma in football is to reduce hitting in practice.

A new study published this week in JAMA Neurology found that 72% of concussions in college football over 5 seasons happened in practice, not games. What’s more, the two men note, while preseason training accounted for only around one-fifth of the time researchers studied, nearly half of concussions occurred during this period.

Nowinski and Cantu wrote an accompanying editorial, also published in JAMA Neurology, reacting to the findings.

They wrote: “Ultimately, whether college football players experience preventable concussions in practice or preventable degenerative brain diseases is in the hands of football coaches, football conferences, schools, and the NCAA, none of whom have done enough to reform college football practice, which leads us to ask: who will protect the brains of college football players?”

Click here to read the op-ed from Dr. Robert Cantu and Chris Nowinski, Ph.D.