Fourth Annual NCAA-DoD Grand Alliance Concussion Conference Set for April 23

The NCAA Sport Science Institute, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense, the Atlantic Coast Conference and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, will host the Fourth Annual Department of Defense Grand Alliance Concussion Conference: A New Era of Scientific Collaboration on Thursday, April 23, 2020, from 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Eastern Time at the Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia.

The conference, designed for  athletic trainers, team physicians, sports medicine clinicians and athletic health care administrators from NCAA member schools and other key stakeholders in sport-related concussion will build on the 2017-19 NCAA-DoD Grand Alliance Concussion Conferences. During this conference, concussion experts and researchers will share preliminary and recently publicized information from the NCAA-DoD Grand Alliance, the largest concussion study and educational grand challenge ever conducted.

Previous Conferences:

  • Researchers shared preliminary findings from the largest-ever study of concussion in sport at the first annual sport-related concussion conference hosted by the Pac-12 Conference at the University of California, Los Angeles. Read more about the event.
  • The Second Annual NCAA-U.S. Department of Defense Grand Alliance Concussion Conference was held on Friday, Apr. 20, 2018 at Eisenhower Hall on the USMA campus in West Point, NY.  Download the conference syllabus.
  • The Third Annual NCAA-U.S. Department of Defense Grand Alliance Concussion Conferencewas held on Wednesday, Apr. 24, 2019 at the Discovery Building on the campus of University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin.  Download the conference syllabus.
Posted in College, CTE, Football, General, insurance, Litigation, Other Sports | Tagged | Comments Off on Fourth Annual NCAA-DoD Grand Alliance Concussion Conference Set for April 23

Concussion Legacy Foundation’s Nowinski Gets Active on Social on Eve of Super Bowl

(Editor’s Note: The following is one of nine stories that will appear in Concussion Litigation Reporter this week. To subscribe, visit here.)

Christopher Nowinski, Co-Founder & CEO of the Concussion Legacy Foundation (CLF), is as influential as anyone when it comes to highlighting the dangers of sports concussions.

So it was no surprise that the CLF was behind the creation of a Public Service Announcement (PSA) that generated a lot of buzz last fall.

Nowinski spent Saturday, they day before the Super Bowl, reminding everyone about those dangers on LinkedIn.

“Did you know that any future high school, college or NFL football player who starts tackle football at age 5 will have 10 times the odds of developing CTE than if he had started at age 14?” he wrote in a post.

Chris Nowinski

“Our provocative ‘Tackle Can Wait’ PSA drives home the message that youth tackle football is unacceptably dangerous for children. The PSA, which shows youth tackle football players smoking while playing the game, is inspired by research showing that the risk of developing CTE is not correlated to number of concussions, but is instead correlated with the number of years playing tackle football. The research showed the link between tackle football and CTE may be stronger than the link between smoking and lung cancer. The Concussion Legacy Foundation‘s message to parents on Super Bowl weekend is simple: wait until age 14 to allow your children to play tackle football.

“Thanks to the amazing team at Fingerpaint for their work on this campaign. For information about the research behind the PSA, visit TackleCanWait.com

In the comment section below the post, he was asked about the study, which he dutifully provided: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6973077/pdf/ANA-87-116.pdf

Posted in CTE, Football, General, High School, youth | Tagged | Comments Off on Concussion Legacy Foundation’s Nowinski Gets Active on Social on Eve of Super Bowl

New Research Suggests Early Treatment May Mean Faster Recovery

Early clinical treatment may significantly reduce recovery time following a concussion, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Sports Medicine Concussion Program.

The results, published today in JAMA Neurology, suggest delays in seeking treatment can lead to unnecessarily longer recovery.

“Our study emphasizes the importance of seeking appropriate, specialized care early on. Delaying clinical care following a concussion leaves patients to deal with symptoms on their own and negates the positive effects of early and targeted interventions,” said senior author Anthony Kontos, Ph.D., research director at Pitt’s Sports Medicine Concussion Program.

A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury caused by a jolt to the head or body that disrupts the function of the brain. This injury can result in physical, cognitive, emotional and/or sleep-related symptoms that may or may not involve a loss of consciousness. The symptoms can last from several minutes, to days, weeks, months or longer.

Kontos and his team analyzed 162 athletes with diagnosed concussion injuries between the ages of 12 and 22 years. Athletes treated within the first week of injury recovered faster than athletes who did not receive care until eight days to three weeks after injury. Once in care, the length of time spent recovering was the same for athletes evaluated within the first week of injury compared to those evaluated eight days to three weeks post-injury, indicating the days before initial clinical care was the primary driver for the longer recovery duration.

“Early clinical care including behavioral management interventions and targeted exertion, vestibular and oculomotor rehabilitation exercises also may minimize missed time at work, school or sports, helping the patient return to a normal routine sooner,” said Michael “Micky” Collins, Ph.D., executive and clinical director, UPMC Sports Medicine Program.

Kontos and his colleagues say future research should look into the biological reasons why earlier engagement with care promotes faster recovery, as well as explore whether their findings could apply to other types of patients, such as military personnel.

###

Co-authors include Michael Collins, Ph.D., Alicia Trbovich, Ph.D., Nathan Ernst, Psy.D., Kouros Emami, Psy.D., Brandon Gillie, Ph.D., Jonathan French, Psy.D., and Cyndi Holland, M.P.H., all of Pitt; Kendra Jorgensen-Wagers, Ph.D., of Landstuhl Regional Medical Center; and R.J. Elbin, Ph.D., of University of Arkansas.

Posted in CTE, General | Tagged | Comments Off on New Research Suggests Early Treatment May Mean Faster Recovery