Tag Archives: academic

Academic Dysfunction Among Injured Students Greatest Among Those with Concussions

According to a new study in the American Journal of Public Health, students with concussions show more academic dysfunction — or inability to perform at a normal academic level — one week after injury than students who experience extremity injuries.

Researchers from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry conducted a study from September 2013 through January 2015 of high school and college students who had visited three emergency departments in the Rochester, New York, area for a sports-related concussion or musculoskeletal extremity injury. Using telephone surveys, the researchers compared self-reported academic dysfunction between students with concussions and a comparison group of students with extremity injuries at 1 week and 1 month after injury.

Results showed that students with concussions had more academic dysfunction one week after injury than students who experience extremity injuries. Students with a concussion took longer to return to school post-injury and received more academic adjustments — such as extra time on tests and tutoring. The results also showed that female students and students with a history of two or more previous concussions were more susceptible to the effects of concussion. At one-month after injury, however, there were no observed differences between students with concussions and those with extremity injuries.

“Concussed students typically return to school within a week after injury, while their brains are likely still recovering,” the authors explain. “Our results emphasize the need for return-to-learn guidelines and academic adjustments based on gender and concussion history.”

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The NFL Concussion Settlement and the Ethics of Informed Choice

(Editor’s Note: What follows is an execrpt from an exclusive article written by Richard Robeson and Nancy M. P. King for the February issue of Concussion Litigation Reporter. The authors are professors from Wake Forest University)

In January 2014, Judge Anita B. Brody rejected1 the terms of a class action settlement between the National Football League (NFL) and a litigation class consisting of former NFL players with concussion-related health issues and the descendants and heirs of deceased players whose deaths were related to concussions — mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) — sustained during their playing careers. Although the amount of the settlement was agreed to by both plaintiffs’ attorneys and attorneys for the NFL, Judge Brody expressed concern that its $765 million cap would be inadequate to the medical and financial needs of not only the more than 5, 000 former players who filed suit but also some 18, 000 former players who would be eligible over the settlement’s 65-year term.2 Judge Brody therefore ordered the cap to be lifted and the settlement renegotiated. Some current players also expressed dissatisfaction with the settlement, with one player pointing out that $765 million divided by the League’s 32 teams was equivalent to one-third of the average one-year salary per team.3 Another player called it “hush money,”4 because one of the conditions of the agreement was that the NFL would not admit to any wrongdoing regarding its handling of concussions or its own concussion research.5

The renegotiated settlement approved in April 2015 by Judge Brody is now worth $1 billion;6 and over the last several years the NFL has drastically altered how it handles possible concussions7 and Return-to-Participation.8 Even so, the settlement’s exclusions9 — not least among them being that no one who retired after July 7, 2014 can benefit — have been the cause of yet more recrimination and appeal. Some plaintiffs are especially dissatisfied that chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease that is associated with repeated concussions (recurrent MTBI), is a diagnosis that is expressly not covered by the settlement.10 This latter exclusion is the essential cause of the appeal, a ruling upon which is anticipated early this year. These putative shortcomings have significant implications for current players, including how the matter of informed consent may be regarded. … (To read more, subsccribe here.)

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Study: Student Athletes Have Longer Recovery Time During School Year, Then Summer

A study by the Concussion Clinic at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota has revealed that a child who sustains a concussion during the school year has a longer recovery time than one who suffers the same injury over the summer.1-IMG_1890 (2)

“We were surprised at the magnitude of the differences,” Robert Doss, PsyD, co-director of the Pediatric Concussion Program and one of the study’s researchers, told the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. “We weren’t surprised that it was in that direction; just simply that the magnitude was what it was.”

The article quoted another study, “Returning to Learning Following a Concussion,” which was published in October in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The study “explains the difficulties children experience in a school setting after suffering a concussion. Post-concussive symptoms often can linger or increase in severity without proper adjustments to a child’s environment or academic routine. Research suggests that academic demands and school environment may be a barrier to recovery.

“Because each concussion and child is different, the AAP study recommends creating a multidisciplinary team to facilitate a student’s recovery and help him or her return to normal activities. Those four teams are:

  • “Family (student, parents, guardians, grandparents, peers, teammates and family friends)
  • Medical (emergency department, primary care provider, concussion specialist, clinical psychologist, neuropsychologist, team and/or school physician)
  • School academic (teacher, school counselor, school psychologist, social worker, school nurse, school administrator, school physician)
  • School physical activity (school nurse, athletic trainer, coach, physical education teacher, playground supervisor, school physician).”

Doss went on to stress the importance of the “individual child” to the paper. “It seems like our practitioners are noticing more responsiveness by the schools to put forth accommodations for these kids,” he said. “Some schools are more accommodating than others. Some seem to have a grasp of concussions.

“Overall, I think our perception is that schools are more receptive and thinking about it more actively. They’re instituting programs on their own, so they’re prepared for what comes next.”

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